BANGKOK RESTAURANT

Miharu

This modern-looking Japanese wooden house in Saladaeng is a go-to place for sashimi that doesn't break the bank. 

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Average: 2 (1 vote)

This modern-looking Japanese wooden house in Saladaeng is a go-to place for sashimi that doesn't break the bank. Led by Tokyo-born chef Yoshihisa Sahara, who has 30 years' experience in the game, the restaurant's highlight's include salmon oyako don (salmon sashimi and salmon roe on rice) and salmon kisami wasabi don (cubed salmon and maguro sashimi with fresh wasabi on rice). They also specialize in shabu, with monthly food and drink deals to consider, too.

Sala Daeng is a whole different vibe to Soi Thaniya, just opposite on Silom. While Soi Thaniya turns into a seedy Japanese red light district at night, Sala Daeng, particularly Soi 1, fills up with office workers from the nearby towers. And while we wouldn't recommend the food at Miharu over what you can get in Thaniya, the vibe is definitely much nicer.

Occupying two former shop-houses, the space is now decorated with plenty of nods to Japan, but also a splash of whimsy: patterned fabrics, screens providing intimacy and ceiling mobiles. The ground floor, home to a few tables and a sushi bar, leads up to a larger dining area, mezzanine and private dining room. It means the place works both for a couple and for big boisterous tables--and allows them all to coexist happily. Overall, it just feels a lot more friendly than your average gritty izakaya.

Despite Tokyo-born chef Yoshihisa Sahara, who has 30 years' experience in the game, Miharu is equally influenced by its owner, an heir to the Rojana Industrial Estates. The result is a menu that spans everything from fusion maki and salads drizzled in mayo to shabu, light drinking snacks, sushi, sashimi, tempura and grilled fish. Results are disappointing. Both in the sushi and the don (rice bowls), the rice feels dry, the grains too small and compact. The hana nigiri sushi set (B500) comes with several other issues: a dry cooked shrimp, sloppy or excessively thin cuts of fish and shrimp roe instead of salmon roe. We can't help but compare it to the excellent sets at Sushi Masa (B350, salmon roe included). We'd also advise you avoid the tempura altogether (tempura moi awase, B230). The batter is thick, oily and the produce inside limp and mushy. We don't think a deep-fried battered shrimp should droop down like a flag on a windless day when you hold it by its tail. 

Mihuro takes pride in its salmon oyako don (salmon sashimi and salmon roe on rice, B380) and salmon kisami wasabi don (cubed salmon and maguro sashimi on rice, B380) and we'd tend to agree they're some of the safest bets on the menu. The fresh wasabi they're served with has a much cleaner, more vibrant kick to it than the usual stuff and portions are generous. You also have to look for their many deals on their Facebook page, which range from happy hours to sets and shabu buffets (currently B499). Miharu is a cute, affordable place with decent food, but in a city so obsessed with Japanese cuisine, it fails to stand out.

Venue Details
Address: Miharu, 14/9-10 Sala Daeng Soi 1, Bangkok, Thailand
Phone: 02-633-8388
Website: www.facebook.com/miharu.japanese.eatery
Area: Silom
Cuisine: Japanese
Price Range: BBB
Open since: May, 2014
Opening hours: daily 11:30am-2:30pm, 5:30-10:30pm
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