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Numchok “Singto” Tanudrum’s tells us about making his own waves in the music scene
After a three year stint in Phuket, the laidback surf sounds of Numchok “Singto” Tanudrum’s debut Leave It There album along with his live performances have drawn favorable comparisons with the likes of Jack Johnson and Jason Mraz. Fresh from winning the first Thailand Ukele Competition, he tells us about making his own waves in the music scene.

By Monruedee Jansuttipan | Sep 02, 2010

  • Numchok “Singto” Tanudrum’s tells us about making his own waves in the music scene

BK: What’s your personal background?
Singhto:
I was born in Buriram and stayed in Bangkok for a while before I had the idea to do something different. I decided to go to Phuket to play music and planned a long trip for three months. But it ended up being three years.

BK: And musically?
Singhto:
I use to play guitar for Mono, which back then were signed to RS records. But to be honest it wasn’t going well, so I decided to just go travelling and try to advance my musical experiences.

BK: How would you define surf music?
Singhto:
It’s just a type of easy-listening pop music. When people listen to it, they think about the sea and sun.

BK: Why do you prefer this musical style?
Singhto:
I listened to the music from Jack Johnson’s Brushfire Fairytales and just thought, why do we don’t have this kind of music here. Thailand already has music like reggae and ska but no surf. So I decided to give it a try.

BK: How is your sound unique?
Singhto:
It’s all about feelings. Thailand’ beaches are not like any others. We have everything on the beach, sand, stall, somtam and people. So I try to do it in a Thai way, I’m not an American beach boy. I’m trying to convey our culture.

BK: How did the album come about?
Singhto:
I met Jetkanya “Nitting” Triyanont, sister of Kij Monotone who owns Pollen Sound. She opened a coffee shop and I asked to play there in exchange for cups of coffee. We decided to do a record and Kij produced it. In the end we decided to release it on Believe Record as they could help with the PR.

BK: And why did you enter a ukulele competition?
Singhto:
I applied, while making the album, because I wanted to win the grand prize of two good quality B16,000 ukuleles. I thought it would be nice to make my album with these because they sounded better than the ukulele I had. I sent in a clip and luckily the audience voted for me. So my wish came true.

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Pravit Rojanaphruk, 49, is a senior staff writer at Khaosod English who for over 20 years worked as The Nation’s star reporter. On Aug 1, he received a phone call from the Tech Crime Suppression Police, telling him that they were pressing charges against him for Facebook posts made in 2015. He now faces 14 years in jail for sedition. Known for his brave journalism and critique of the current military regime, Pravit has twice been put in “attitude adjustment” camp, once in 2014 and again in 2015. Here, he discusses those experiences and the state of freedom of expression in Thailand.