Dunk Phankorn: Born to be Rebel
A “rebel” by the Thai music industry’s standards, Phankorn “Dunk” Boonyachinda speaks of having a nice dad who was chief of police and the joy of shopping for brands.

By Monruedee Jansuttipan | Sep 23, 2010

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  • Dunk Phankorn: Born to be Rebel

I was an unconventional kid. I always did things that my parents never wanted me to do like dye my hair, get piercings and tattoos.

My teenage life was pretty punk. That and partying. I used to push my car out of the house then start the engine so no one could hear that I was sneaking off to go out.

My dad is my main ally. People might think that because he’s a big policeman he might be tough, but he never scolded me once. He always backed me up.

I even had secret code with him. “Eating out at soi 38” meant I would go party that night.

My mom is quite strict but I was too extreme to follow her rules.

My rebellious thoughts may have come from England where I grew up.

I used to dream of being a chief of police like my father but I didn’t care to climb the long ladder to that position.

My first album was not really rock. It was just fun pop. Thai people, though, saw it as rock because of the performance and yelling.

England is like my second home. I absorbed English music while I was studying there. I became one of them, and that mixed in with my Thainess.

I feel repressed and blow off steam through music. I share my feelings with the audience.

I started my own record label because I am older and my family owns KPN Music School. It would be nice if we had records of our own with me as the number one artist of the label. Now I’m preparing for my 12th anniversary concert on Oct 9.

I don’t have to be afraid to make my music anymore. I don’t have to worry whether someone like Surachai Chetchotisak, chief executive of the RS, will like it or not. If I want to feature with someone, I can do it right away. I don’t have to limit myself.

I was born to be a singer. I never thought to do something else.

The music industry has had a lot of changes over the last 10 years, from tapes to CDs, from copyrights to piracy. There is both good and bad in this era.

I don’t blame anyone about the piracy problem. The records companies are the ones who have to change. You can’t expect to sit and wait for people to buy your song. People don’t buy anymore.

I’m really crazy about brand name accessories. I don’t believe in cheap stuff. Good stuff has to be expensive. You can really see the difference, especially in the materials used.

The most expensive accessory that I bought was a watch. It was in the seven digits.

My father taught me that if you want to spend a lot you have to earn a lot. Otherwise your life will be ruined.

I always wear sunglasses because of my dry eyes and myopia. I used to wear contact lenses but had to stop because my allergy medications made my eyes very dry.

Love is good but it’s hard to find someone to be with. If I can’t find the right one, I’d rather be alone. I want the perfect one. Whatever happens, it happens. Let nature find the right one for me.

I let people say whatever they want to say about my gay look. I’m happy to when I’m around friends and family. That’s it.

I don’t see homosexual people as different from others. You should judge them only on their talent and behavior.

We’re all human. We have to live on our own and do good for others.

Think pink, think positive. Happiness is everywhere. It depends on you to see that it’s all around. You have to see everything in a positive way otherwise you will destroy your own happiness and suffer alone.

I would rather be Prime Minister than Governor because of my leadership instinct. I love to be the one who makes the decisions.

Dharma makes you understand life better, makes you let go of things too, and not suffer.

Make Thailand a better place. Give to charity, make merit or anything you can do.

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